Please wait...
Please wait...
ums.org

latest

Quiz: Test your classical music savvy!

Posted: 9/8/14 -- 8:00 am

Find out how much you really know about classical music through our handy quiz.…

Read the full story

latest

Student Spotlight: Dispatch from Russia: The Real Interns of the Hermitage State Museum

Posted: 11/17/14 -- 8:00 am

Editor’s note: Polina Fradkin is a student at the University of Michigan and part of our UMS student intern team. This summer, Polina traveled to Russia for an internship...…

Read the full story

latest

Behind the Scenes with Soprano Janai Brugger:

Posted: 11/13/14 -- 8:00 am

This post is a part of a series of playlists curated by artists, UMS Staff, and community. Check out more music here. Soprano Janai Brugger performs at our annual Handel’s...…

Read the full story

latest

Handel’s Messiah: A history in photos, programs, and video

Posted: 11/14/13 -- 8:00 am

A history of our annual Handel's Messiah tradition in photos, programs, and video.…

Read the full story

latest

‘Tis the Season: Your Messiah Memories

Posted: 11/15/13 -- 7:30 am

An annual tradition since 1879, UMS’s presentation of Handel’s Messiah has become a “signature” Ann Arbor experience.  We’re so grateful for the...…

Read the full story

latest

New UMS Artists in “Residence” Program:

Posted: 8/29/14 -- 8:00 am

UMS is pleased to announce a new artists in “residence” program, open to area artists in the visual arts, literary arts, and performing arts. Learn more.…

Read the full story

performances & events

12/6-12/7/2014

TICKETS Handel’s Messiah

performances & events

12/9/2014

TICKETS Rossini’s William Tell

performances & events

12/11/2014

TICKETS National Theatre Live: David Hare’s...

performances & events

1/7-1/10/2015

TICKETS Helen & Edgar

performances & events

1/17/2015

TICKETS eighth blackbird

performances & events

1/18/15

TICKETS National Theatre Live: JOHN

performances & events

1/23/2015

TICKETS Compagnie Marie Chouinard

performances & events

1/24-1/25/2015

TICKETS Mariinsky Orchestra

performances & events

1/31/2015

TICKETS Dawn of MIDI

performances & events

2/5/2015

TICKETS Tomasz Stańko, trumpet

performances & events

2/6/2015

TICKETS Jennifer Koh, violin

performances & events

2/14/2015

TICKETS Mendelssohn’s Elijah

performances & events

2/15/2015

TICKETS Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra...

performances & events

2/19/2015

TICKETS Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra

performances & events

2/20/2015

TICKETS The Campbell Brothers

performances & events

2/14-2/21/2015

TICKETS Compagnie Non Nova: Compagnie Non...

performances & events

2/22/15

TICKETS National Theatre Live: Robert Louis...

performances & events

3/12-3/13/2015

TICKETS A Bill Frisell Americana Celebration

performances & events

3/13-3/14/2015

TICKETS Kyle Abraham / Abraham.In.Motion

performances & events

3/15/15

TICKETS Royal Shakespeare Company Live...

performances & events

3/22/2015

TICKETS Chicago Symphony Winds

performances & events

3/25/2015

TICKETS Academy of St. Martin in the Fields...

performances & events

4/4/2015

TICKETS Gilberto Gil

performances & events

4/9/2015

TICKETS Max Raabe and the Palast Orchester

performances & events

4/16/2015

TICKETS An Evening with Herbie Hancock...

performances & events

4/17/2015

TICKETS Oliver Mtukudzi and the Black Spirits

performances & events

4/19/2015

TICKETS Artemis Quartet

performances & events

4/22/2015

TICKETS Royal Shakespeare Company Live...

performances & events

4/23/2015

TICKETS Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

performances & events

4/24-4/26/2015

TICKETS Lyon Opera Ballet

Photo of the Week

Making cookies in ugly holiday sweaters

Helen and Edgar production

TICKETS 1/7-1/10/2015

Helen & Edgar

Valery Gergiev conductor

TICKETS 1/24-1/25/2015

Mariinsky Orchestra

Dawnofmidi-new-334x230

TICKETS 1/31/2015

Dawn of MIDI

Cinderella production

TICKETS 4/24-4/26/2015

Lyon Opera Ballet

Video of the Week

A Video History of Handel’s Messiah

People Are Talking: UMS presents Yuja Wang and Leonidas Kavakos at Hill Auditorium

Posted: 11/23/14 -- 12:00 pm

avatar
May I also add..if I wanted to see a rockstar, I'd go to a rock concert, though I never would since I've grown out of them.

Maria

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 8:56 pm

avatar
Hello- I’m Isabel Park, a first-year U-M piano student attending several UMS piano performances this season and sharing my thoughts here on UMS Lobby after. If you’d like to read more: http://www.umslobby.org/index.php/2014/11/student-spotlight-u-m-first-year-student-isabel-park-sets-out-to-explore-piano-15982 I’d love to hear your responses! I was curious how Yuja Wang’s soloistic performance style would play out in a chamber music setting; last night, she proved that her versatility as a musician falls nothing short of professional. The opening of the Brahms was presented so intimately, which set up a proper atmosphere for the duration of the concert. The tones of both Wang and Kavakos complemented each other in such a way that the warmth of Brahms was undeniably present. Despite the thick textures of Brahms, the duo’s interpretation was subtly adorned with tasteful rubato, a contained excitement, and flawless accuracy that ultimately provided what seemed to be an effortlessly simple performance of the sonata. The recurring descending melody in the Ziemlich langsam -- Lebhaft of the Schumann was beautiful and perhaps the most memorable part of the entire concert. The contained excitement built up in the Brahms seemed to bloom in the final movement and even more so in the coda, which was so dramatically Schumann-esque. Ravel’s sonata, again accumulated a refined energy -- which was diffused only slightly in the subtle, but satisfying final chord. The energy sustained the duo through a thrilling delivery of their final piece, Respighi’s b minor Sonata. Wang took advantage of the piece to showcase her unmatched finger power and the clarity with which she can play difficult passages that challenge even the most adequate player’s technical facility. Throughout, she was able to give the audience an impressive soloistic sound while maintaining a tight-knit sense of ensemble. As a pianist myself, this chamber performance reminded me of the intimate interaction that goes on through music, both amongst the performers and between the performers and the audience. I think this connection is crucial to a good performance, despite all the objective aspects. I will certainly be looking for this in the upcoming performances that I attend.

Isabel Park

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 8:08 pm

avatar
Bravo Wendy! You are a star! You are so right! And what a wonderful review! Except I thought the applause in the end was thunderous and demanding. It stopped because people got upset the players left without an encore but then everyone sympathized when they found out they had to run to the airport. The response of the public was atypical because each movement was so good. Even I got carried out once in between movements and my husband was shocked.

Maria

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 6:41 pm

avatar
To UMS Lobby: Please don't ask such silllllly questions on a poll as "which artist did you like more" etc. In this case both are clearly supreme artists at the top of their powers, each in their own right, and even more substantially in their entity as a duo. This concert was poetry, not a poetry slam! It was not a contest! Even having a poll of this nature implies that it's a valid question. Maybe before concerts, we need to disseminate more information about the music and the process and magic of music making, so people who are curious but aren't sure what to listen for, can learn to enjoy collaborations of this quality at much fuller and more gratifying levels of listening. It would sure make the price of the ticket and the time spent at the concert hall, even more worthwhile!!!

Wendy

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 3:04 pm

avatar
Of course Schumann couldn't have been there listening to the salon concert of the Brahms A Major, but his spirit could have been! ;)

Wendy

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 2:43 pm

avatar
I'm more able to write about jazz but the concert had a certain fury that was incredible. Someone mentioned a salon concert, it was a bit of that. In jazz it's the art of surprise and that applies a little bit to classical too. UMS sponsored a pop up concert in Barnes & Noble of Bela Fleck & the Brooklyn Riders about a year ago...that was great. In West Coast parlance last evening was a Happening!

Robert Kinsey

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 12:19 pm

avatar
I wasn't aware that they "couldn't wait to go"..., but I was hoping for an encore but it seemed to me that the audience applause died out way too soon for the quality of performance to which we'd been treated. Ironically, the applause was not wanting throughout the performance, where a substantial segment of the audience at Hill was providing polite applause after every movement of each sonata. Kavakos, after a while, took to holding his bow up on his strings after completion of a movement, and turning his page with his left hand just to keep the applause from breaking the spell of mood, or to enable a key change to be savoref, etc. Therefore, I wondered, in light of their fast escape, which I heard was to catch a plane, whether perhaps what added to their hasty retreat from the stage was the audience behavior, so atypical for the Hill crowd. But now, as to the playing, I was swept into reverie by a rendering of the Brahms op. 100 such as I've never encountered; entreating, sultry, inviting, velvety, rhapsodic, and understated, leaving a hunger to hear more. Both spoke in tones of powerful but hushed passion, a portraying of Brahms' love of Clara while both held beloved Schumann in their embrace. And then, this emotive sonata of Schumann, with rapturous themes and hidden romantic embedded messages in the name note letter spelling, hidden musical emoticons as these dear friends so often used in their compositions. It was perfectly performed by the consummate artists on stage. I felt for the first half that I was privy to an intimate salon concert of Brahms and Clara in turns at the piano, with Ferdinand David on violin, and Robert a very pleased and approving listener. I was a delighted listener too, never having heard this gem performed before. All the sonatas of Schumann deserve to be enjoyed, they are part of his great outpouring of love and song at the peak of his creative genius, just before the curtain of madness fell around him. Now jump to the second half. New air! Extroverted! Openly impassioned! I was not familiar with the early Ravel, but I loved it! Only too short... Both Kavakos and Wang made the transition to Frrrench sound and sensibility and I was transported southward. The Respighi opened in fireworks of sound, color painting in full warm Italian splendor! The playing of Kavakos kept opening up as the Respighi demanded it. This piece was another great treat and surprise for me, having never heard it performed live before. Both artists played with deep, rich colors of sound, always refined and velvety, never scratchy or bangy, even when playing at full throttle and fully emotive. To this listener, their musical rapport was so complete that it felt like a single genius heart and mind had given life to each sonata on this program. Thank you, UMS, for bringing this incredible duo to Ann Arbor!

Wendy

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 11:16 am

avatar
We were really lucky to have one of the best violinists in the world, and an extremely good pianist. The music they played was amazing, though sometimes the piano was a bit t loud.

Pavlos Papaefthymiou

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 7:42 am

avatar
I had a very pleasant evening but it seemed to me that Yuja Wang didn't look like she really wanted to be there. Perhaps tired from her busy schedule. Certainly not what I expected from the various images I have seen of her dynamic playing elsewhere. Particularly near then end when it looked like they could'nt wait to leave. Keith

Keith Gilroy

Posted: 11/24/14 -- 6:07 am

avatar
Mr. Kavakos excels in delicacy and sweetness of tone. I am so glad that he threw off the shackles after intermission that had seemed to hold him back before. His playing now became a lot more con amore. If you’re going to play duets with the passionate Ms. Wang, you mustn’t get too shy and meditative. She dominated through much of the evening (and not only in the billing on the program or in the curtain calls.) She, too, produced a warm round sound -- even when she played too loud and covered up her partner. The program was a model – familiar as well as fresher pieces and, for a welcome change, skipping over the Beethoven sonatas which have become practically obligatory in our day. Only heard that Respighi once before. Want to hear it again. Never heard the Schumann. Expected to hear the other Ravel sonata. But happy with this one. And do y’all remember how in the olden days Heifetz, Milstein, Elman, Ricci, Francescatti, and the rest of the gang used to play some serious sonatas in the first half of every program before regaling us with a slew of fireworks after intermission – Paganini, Sarasate, Wieniawsky. A lot of fun stuff! But not this pair! Nah, all serious nourishing stuff. Very fine program and concert.

Music Lover

Posted: 11/23/14 -- 11:02 pm

avatar
Correction, Ms. Wang played Carnegie Hall last night. Stands to reason that such a talent would be Saturday night in New York fare. She is off to San Francisco Dec. 1. Sorry for the fuzzy logic.*

Robert Kinsey

Posted: 11/23/14 -- 9:04 pm

avatar
This kind of music really hit the spot. I'm watching 60 Minutes with dissaster after dissaster....but what me worry? I live by the river! On a serious note I understand the performers skipped through Michigan for a matter of hours on their way to play Carnegie Hall. They looked a bit jet lagged by my goodness could they play. Perhaps they could return some Spring weekend & stretch their legs in the peony garden or such.

Robert Kinsey

Posted: 11/23/14 -- 8:13 pm