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Welcome to the Cabaret:

Posted: 3/5/12 -- 1:39 pm

Tobias Wacker, owner of lab, has been talking to us about Max Raabe ever since we announced the 11/12 season. Toby's enthusiasm is so infectious that we felt it would be a true...…

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Student Spotlight: Greg Hicks on How Max Raabe’s Tailored Tuxes Will Open Your Mind

Posted: 3/19/15 -- 8:00 am

How Max Raabe and the Palast Orchester's intentional "tailored tux" aesthetic expands their programming range and opens the minds of minds of audiences.…

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A Taste of Tropicália:

Posted: 2/13/15 -- 5:00 am

Photo: Brazilian star Gilberto Gil performs at Hill Auditorium on April 4, 2015 at Hill Auditorium. Photo by Jorge Bispo. The Brazilian Tropicália movement in the late 1960s...…

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My Encounters with Gilberto Gil:

Posted: 10/30/12 -- 8:00 am

It is an honor and a pleasure to be asked by UMS to write about Gil. Yet it wasn’t so easy to know where to start. I decided not to try to cover his music career or work as...…

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performances & events

4/4/2015

TICKETS Gilberto Gil

performances & events

4/9/2015

TICKETS Max Raabe and the Palast Orchester

performances & events

4/16/2015

TICKETS An Evening with Herbie Hancock...

performances & events

4/17/2015

TICKETS Oliver Mtukudzi and the Black Spirits

performances & events

4/19/2015

TICKETS Artemis Quartet

performances & events

4/22/2015

TICKETS Royal Shakespeare Company Live...

performances & events

4/23/2015

TICKETS CANCELED: Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

performances & events

4/24-4/26/2015

TICKETS Lyon Opera Ballet

Photo of the Week

UMS K-12 Workshops

People Are Talking: UMS presents Academy of St. Martin in the Fields and Jeremy Denk, piano at Hill Auditorium

Posted: 3/25/15 -- 12:00 pm

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This concert was a real treat! After years of listening to their recordings to hear and see them in person was inspiring. Mr Denk, the man is a Wizzard in full command of his craft, there was so much joy in his playing it's almost as if he could have willed the piano to play on its own. The only done side to this lovely concert in this lovely hall were the two students seated a few rows behind me and to my right. I heard every word of their whispered conversation during every second of the performance.

Charles Hooper

Posted: 3/27/15 -- 12:50 pm

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It was the final movement from an early Mozart divertimento, K. 116.

Avigdor

Posted: 3/27/15 -- 1:27 am

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It was No. 13

Avigdor

Posted: 3/27/15 -- 1:20 am

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Isabel, I agree with your review. I also loved the second movement. I thought that his contemplative approach to the Bach really came through in this section. In that regard I thought that his Goldberg Variation encore was spectacular (and my most enjoyable part of his performance). I also concur that the tempi were troubling to me, at first. My initial reaction was tempered, however, as the movements continued. I found the each tempo helped to drive the energy of the piece faster and harder. I guess that the speed grew on me and that I ended up finding what was, at first, jarring, to be exhilarating.

Ken Posner

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 9:08 pm

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The encore they played last was fantastic! It definitely sunds like Mozart. Anyone knows exactly what piese was that? Thanks

Fei

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 7:05 pm

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Great concert though I am a bit of an "original constructivist" here: Tony Scalia move over! I loved Denk's playing and the strings' playing, but I prefer a harpsichord for the combination. My favorite pieces were the Stravinsky Concerto and the encore from the Goldberg Variations (Denk *solo*). Bought the GV CD afterwards, have to stack it up against Glenn Gould. This guy (Denk) is really serious!!

Dan Burns

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 3:49 pm

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I had not seen or heard of Jeremy Denk previously. Hearing him play the Bach concertos on a concert grand brought a vitality and excitement to the concert that was the experience of a lifetime! His exquisite and powerful rendering of these concertos blended perfectly with the string orchestra, as no rendering on original instruments could hope to achieve. The evening was positively thrilling!

Edward Davidson

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 1:45 pm

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A most elegant and satisfying concert, imaginatively programmed. It's fascinating to watch the changing tastes in approaches to Bach playing, from the revolution (at the time) of Glenn Gould, through the original instrument movement, and now to Mr. Denk, who brings scholarship infused with passion and incredible pianism. I heard things in these pieces that were new to me. The orchestra's grace, polish and seemingly effortless ensemble gave all the music a winning immediacy.

David and Lonnie

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 10:01 am

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I really enjoyed the concert especially the Bach and as others have mentioned an interesting contrast ! I though Mr. Denks playing was very energetic and respectfully playful. One could see he was having fun up there and certainly had a command of the music. In closing I thought he really portrayed the musicality of Bach in a manner that most other performers are unable to do!

Charles Schwab

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 8:29 am

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Hello--this is Shannon Fitzsimons from the UMS Education and Community Engagement Department. The Academy's group encore this evening was the final movement from Mozart's Divertimento in D. As my colleague Mark mentioned, Mr. Denk's encore was the 13th variation of J.S. Bach's Goldberg Variations.

Shannon Fitzsimons, UMS

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 2:47 am

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Hi, Mark Jacobson from UMS Programming, here. Jeremy Denk's mid-concert solo piano encore was "Variation 13 (a 2 Clav.)" of J.S. Bach's Goldberg Variations, BWV 988. Thanks for joining the post-concert conversation. -Mark Jacobson, UMS

Mark Jacobson

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 1:16 am

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Hello- I’m Isabel Park, a first-year U-M piano student attending several UMS piano performances this season and sharing my thoughts here on UMS Lobby after. If you’d like to read more: http://www.umslobby.org/index.php/2014/11/student-spotlight-u-m-first-year-student-isabel-park-sets-out-to-explore-piano-15982 I’d love to hear your responses! I had to wonder: would Mr. Denk’s playing be as thoughtful and engaging as his writing? He certainly surpassed my hopes, to say the least. The opening movement of the Bach concerto was nothing short of breathtaking. There was a contagious energy that was viscerally stimulating throughout the duration of the performance. Bach is difficult in that sense - to add a dimension of emotional appeal without tarnishing its paradoxically complex simplicity. But Mr. Denk played with such a conviction that undoubtedly did the concerto justice. Each individual melody was attentively crafted, and delivered with eloquent contour. He was clearly aware of the homophony as shown through his well-executed decisions to bring specific lines to the forefront of his sound. The only aspect that I didn’t fully agree with were the tempi, which seemed rather fast in the quicker movements, but it was relatively minor and didn’t present much of an issue. The second movement was contemplative and introverted in just the appropriate ways. It was sensitively played, yet uninhibited in terms of artistic flourish and expression. He didn’t fall into the tendency to polarize Bach by either oversimplifying it, or unnecessarily complicating it. Personally, it was my favorite movement - although the final movement was also phenomenal. There was a relentless focus as Mr. Denk played the last movement. The result was a more channeled, directed energy which reflected in the intimacy of the ensemble. Unlike many concerto performances, the soloist didn’t seem to be isolated but rather a featured member of the group. The result was a special effect that was especially memorable during an interlude in which the orchestra held various harmonies under Mr. Denk’s technical passages. The members of the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields only augmented the performance with their seamless ensemble. Not to mention, their sound was incredibly full and satisfying without any excess thickness or residue that enabled them to create the intimacy of a string quartet while delivering the depth of sound of a bigger orchestra. For me personally, the most admirable thing about Mr. Denk tonight was his dual role as both a soloist and ensemble director. His depth of understanding for the music was enviable and his unique musical intelligence really shone through today’s performance. Tonight, I left Hill Auditorium very inspired as a pianist.

Isabel Park

Posted: 3/26/15 -- 12:30 am

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We agree with Music Lover that Sunday's performance of the Chicago winds was superb....it was; proving again the power of up close and personal performances. Richard & Marian

Richard Douglass

Posted: 3/25/15 -- 11:09 pm

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This was a superior concert for many reasons. For Marian and me, however, sitting in the middle of the second row and just 15 feet away from the closest musicians, we were able to sense their joy in performance in a way that made these pieces come alive. It is wonderful to witness in such an intimate way how dedicated artists engage with each other during a performance and how they seem to have such a good time with the music. Richard Douglass & Marian Horowitz

Richard Douglass

Posted: 3/25/15 -- 11:07 pm

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Clever program – Baroque and neo-Baroque. We need clever programs. The tempi in the Back were on the fast side. But mostly Mr. Denk made them work. The St. Martin group is a miraculous ensemble. Played the rhythmically complicated ballet score with balance, virtuosic compaactness, and subtle colors (also in the Concerto). This concert and the Mozart concert by the Chicago Winds the other day are something to remember over the summer and beyond.

Music Lover

Posted: 3/25/15 -- 11:03 pm

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Does anybody know the encore that he played? I think it was one of the Goldberg Variations, but which one?

Ken Posner

Posted: 3/25/15 -- 10:52 pm